UK +44 (0)1865 849841
Malaysia +60 3 2117 5193

Plant Genomics

119 Top AgTech Companies & Investors

2017 was a big year for the AgTech industry, with a record $10.1 billion in investments and an increase of 29% from 2016. Looking forward, we decided to put together a list of 119 top AgTech start-ups and investors.

In this article, we’ll be talking through the results that were gathered from the report, which you can view here.

Whether you’re looking for an investor from seed to series or you’re just interested in the market, you are sure to find this resource useful.

Read More

Round-Up of Top Plant Science News

It’s been a busy month in the field of Plant Science, with new discoveries, technologies, and research making the news. As the month draws to a close, we thought we’d reflect on the top stories.

This month, there was new insights into autophagy, previously extinct plant species, and the way in which climate change poses a potential threat to half of plant and animal species.

Take a look at the list below to find out more: 

Read More

Exploring the Orphan Crop: Pearl Millet

As an awardee of Global Engage’s Early Career Research grant, we are pleased to announce that Ambika Dudhate will be presenting her research about the drought tolerance in pearl millet in detail at the 6th Plant Genomics and Gene Editing Congress: Europe. It will be a great opportunity to discuss the topic on a large platform.

Read More

Is Palm Oil Sustainable for People?

Palm oil belongs to Elaeis, which is the only genus of Arecaceae family that produces edible oil. The current commercial planting is mainly E. guineensis, (Jacq.) originating from West Africa, selected due to its yield superiority. The cultivations occur throughout the tropical belt, especially in Southeast Asia, Africa and South America. To date, palm oil has become the most important oil crop in the world, accounting for 37% of global vegetable oil production. However, palm oil sustainability is always debated. Is palm oil really sustainable for people? To answer this, some facts are worth pondering.

Read More

What’s Next for Plant Genomics?

2017 is drawing to a close and it’s about that time where we begin to reflect. It has been a huge year for plant genomics in terms of technological advancements in the field with two developments in particular: CRISPR and disease resistance.

Successful sequencing, along with the improvement of biological data sets, have given plant scientists the tools and knowledge to make exciting developments to benefit agriculture. Research in plant disease resistance is being used to tackle global issues, such as food security, and novel gene editing technologies like CRISPR will take this research even further. 

Read More

The Development and Application of CRISPR-Cpf1

Genome editing is slowly causing, or has perhaps already caused, a paradigm shift in the world of agriculture and in plant genomics in general. The ability to precisely and easily edit genes has never been as widespread before as it is now. The technology is causing a momentous shift towards using genome editing to not only validate gene function but also to create better crop varieties for the sustenance of a growing human population.

Read More

Understanding the Molecular Basis of Disease Resistance in Plants

There has been tremendous progress in understanding the molecular basis of disease resistance in plants in the last twenty years. However, translation of this knowledge into practical use has been slow.

Read More

Phytobiomes: Embracing Complexity to Achieve a New Vision for Agriculture

Imagine a world in which farmers have at their disposal analytical tools that help them determine the crop, management practices, and inputs to apply to a specific field in a given year, taking into consideration all physical (climate, soil…) and biological conditions (microbes, pests, disease, weeds, animals…)

Read More

Subscribe to Our Newsletter

Get free reports and resources from our world class speakers.
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Life Sciences Twitter Feed

Archive