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Tag: CRISPR-Cas9

How CRISPR/Cas9 can help unravel Salt Stress Responses in Rice

Soil salinity affects a large amount of arable land and is one of the major causes of crop yield reduction worldwide. Rice, a major food crop feeding more than half of the world, is highly susceptible to salinity stress. Developing salt-stress tolerant rice cultivars is essential to sustain world rice production. The major focus of my research at the Maathuis Lab in the Biology Department of the University of York is looking for key players in the complex molecular networks responsible for rice salt-tolerance, and understanding their mode(s) of action.

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Microbiome within Plants, the Rhizophagy cycle and metagenomic discovery strategies

As a result of revolutionary breakthroughs in recent years, plant research has evolved dramatically. At the 6th Plant Genomics & Gene Editing Congress: USA, the latest NGS, “omic” and gene editing technologies being used for progressing plant based research were examined. If you weren’t able to be there in person, these slides are now available from Sharon Doty, James White & Axel Visel.

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Use and misuse of CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing

Since its discovery in 2012, the use of the CRISPR/Cas9 system to edit genomes has raised the expectations for the cure of untreatable disorders. Very often, as biomedical geneticists we found ourselves talking about the potentials and drawbacks of CRIPSR/Cas9 both at scientific and layman level.

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The Future of Plant Gene Editing: A Q&A with Professor Richard Visser

We were delighted to welcome Richard Visser, Professor, Chair and Head of Plant Breeding, Dean of Research, Wageningen University & Research, to the 6th Plant Genomics and Gene Editing Congress, where he presented on the use of novel breeding techniques in practical breeding.

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