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Tag: immuno-oncology

Why do biomarkers fail?

When conducting an experiment to identify biomarkers, it is crucial to design the experiment properly. 80-90% of all biomarker populations for the last 20 years have not and cannot be reproduced, and the main reason that biomarkers fail is that these experiments are not designed properly. In this post, I will outline two ways in which experiments are poorly designed, and then outline the technological and methodological solution in a later blog.

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A 14 colour antibody panel: developing a tool and demonstrating a process

One of the frustrations I have with Flow Cytometry is when companies present their amazing new findings at conferences, and it’s quite often about TMB cells. In my case, I work on these cells perhaps 20% of the time. The rest of the time I work on cells from other parts of the human body – bone marrow, lung, bronchoalveolar lavage, spleen – and in diverse animals such as mice, rats, and even sparrow, chicken, and mosquito.

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Determining the fate of cells with Flow Cytometry

The ability to measure multiple forms of cell death simultaneously represents a significant development for such techniques. I have been using antibodies and more specific forms of dyes to identify mitochondrial activity and reactive oxygen in roughly fifty populations, whereas normally it would only be able to measure one at a time. I will be discussing this work at the Flow Cytometry Congress, and it could prove enormously beneficial to drug and immunotherapy development.

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How to cope with an evolving Immuno-Oncology field and changes in pathology

2018 will be remembered as a decisive year for immuno-oncology. In particular, Nobel Prize winners James Allison of MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas, and Tasuku Honjo of Kyoto University in Japan lifted the field of immunotherapy to international recognition for those outside the scientific and medical communities. For the patient, these new alternatives to standard oncology therapies offer new hope for life-extending treatments using immunotherapy.

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Immunotherapy for Malignant Mesothelioma

The current field of cancer research is seeing gains in almost every aspect of care, from the foundations of the disease to the development of successful treatment. With increased funding and attention to oncology care, immunotherapy and precision medicine are among the most promising patient-centred areas of current research and translational medicine.

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